Upcycled Toddler Sleeping Bag

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You know all those blankets or flannel wraps etc that you have for your baby?  Once they grow you don’t use them anymore…turn them into baby sleeping bags!  The easiest way to keep the blankets on ever!

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I have used baby sleeping bags for both my kids and absolutely love them.  No worrying about your child getting cold when they kick their blankets off, which mine were both excellent at!  The fleece one above is one I made for my Niece earlier this year, and they love it.  So I will be using that pattern again this time.  I have altered it to allow a little more room for the woven (non-stretch) fabric.

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What you’ll need

  • Baby blanket/wrap in appropriate weight, if you are making a winter weight sleeping bag you can use two layers.  I am using cotton flannel wraps for a summer weight bag.  It will need to be at least 1m x 1m (1.09yards).  As long as it is this long on one side you can always make the front or back out of different fabric.
  • Bias Binding for single layered bags (optional for double layers)
  • Domes or Velcro
  • Pattern – Toddler Sleeping Bag Free PDF in size 12m – 24m

 

Step 1 – Print Pattern

Print your pattern in ‘actual size’  or make sure the ‘scale to fit’ box is unchecked depending on what software you are using.  This pattern has the front and back on the same pattern, so you will need to print two copies and cut one for the front and one for the back.

Step 2 – Cut Your Fabric

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Depending on the size of your blanket/wrap you may need to up-pick the seams to get all the additional room you can!

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I then washed and dried the fabric after un-picking, to help wash out the creases and it also gets rid of most of the cut thread.  Who doesn’t like a shortcut!  This pattern is cut on the fold, you will need to cut one front and one back.

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You should have one front piece and one back piece.

 

Step 3 – Sew the sides and bottom

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With the right sides facing (inside out) pin and sew or overlock from one armpit all the way around to the other.  If you are sewing you may need to zigzag the raw edge if your fabric is going to fray.

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Step 4 – Reinforce dome area

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I like to sew pieces of folded out bias to the area where the domes will sit.  This will prevent them pulling out as the flannel fabric alone is not strong enough to hold the domes.

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Pin the bias pieces onto the inside of the fabric, just a little down from the top.

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Sew in place and trim off the excess.  You won’t see the raw edges at the sides as the bias will cover that soon!

 

Step 5 – Bias Binding

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Add your bias binding starting with a folded over edge at one of the underarm seams.  Pin all the way around until you are back in the same spot!

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If you need more instructions for this step you can check out the start of the Bandana-ish Baby Bib Tutorial.  I have sewn the folded over bias slightly differently this time but either way would work fine!

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Sew in the crease closest to the raw edge, starting from the folded over piece at one underarm.  Sew all the way around then overlap the end over top of the folded edge and lock stitch.

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Your bias will sit up like above.  Time to fold it over!

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While you are folding it over pin in place as you go.  It will not sit perfectly round all those curves just yet but a good press after you have sewn it will work wonders!

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And here it is sewn in place!

 

Step 6 – Add Domes

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You can add the first domes on the shoulder tabs, making sure that they go through the small piece of bias you attached earlier.  I have a tutorial with all the dome instructions here.

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As this fabric doesn’t stretch I like to add a dome 2.5cm (1”) in from the side seam to be able to take in the armholes, but still leave plenty of room to get the sleeping bag on or off.

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In the above photo the sleeping bag is inside out, the smooth parts of the domes are on the inside of the seam.  That way if you have them left open when the child is bigger it will still be comfortable.

 

Step 7 – Complete!!!

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My model is a good sized 13 Month old and you can see there is plenty of room for movement and growth.  So it will be large on a 12 month old but a bit of room to grow is always a good idea!

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Congratulations you have finished!  Hopefully you will get much more use out of all those blankets and wraps now!

11 thoughts on “Upcycled Toddler Sleeping Bag

  1. Up-picking? Never heard that term before. You are using a seam ripper and ripping out the seam. Tho' I read in my sewing machine book that a seam ripper is actually meant to open a button hole when you have just made it. I had ONLY ever known it as a "seam ripper"

  2. You're on the money 🙂 it's just another term for seam ripper. I've heard them called a quick unpick too. They are definitely great for opening button holes. I guess it's like serger vs overlocker…same thing different countries. Thanks for your comment!

  3. Hi, there sure is! If you look under the heading 'what you'll need' there is a bullet point called 'pattern'. Next to that highlighted in blue are the words 'toddler sleeping bag'free pdf.. Click this link and it will take you to the pattern. Remember to print in actual size or use the no scaling option depending on your printer, you can measure the test square on the pattern to be sure it printed right. Goodluck I would lover to see your sleeping bag when you are finished!

  4. Hi, there sure is! If you look under the heading 'what you'll need' there is a bullet point called 'pattern'. Next to that highlighted in blue are the words 'toddler sleeping bag'free pdf.. Click this link and it will take you to the pattern. Remember to print in actual size or use the no scaling option depending on your printer, you can measure the test square on the pattern to be sure it printed right. Goodluck I would lover to see your sleeping bag when you are finished!

  5. Hi Helen, No I haven't made a printable for the instructions. That is a great idea though and I will get started on making one soon. It may take me a little while to make up the template so for now you'll need to use this tutorial. Thanks for your comment!

  6. So easy. I lined mine so didn’t have to fiddle with the bias and makes it snuggly for a winter grand baby. I used a single flannelette sheet that was destined for the rag bag, now I know what a great pattern it is I’m on the lookout for some cute fabric.

    1. Thank you Granny Gertz, congratulations on the winter grand baby 🙂 So pleased you upcycled a sheet destined for the rag bag, I love a getting extra use out of things! Glad you like the pattern, good luck finding more cute fabric.

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